Stand Together

Let’s reframe the conversation about the environment

Hearts and Minds

While we feel with our hearts, we think with our brains. So, our perspective on a given issue is defined by how we frame it in our mind. To change the way we act, we need to change the frames through which we see the world.

When we successfully reframe the way we communicate environmental issues, we change the way the public views the environment. We change what counts as common sense.

Thinking Differently

To come up with new frames we need to communicate in new and engaging ways. Creating a new way of relating to the living world is about reframing our values and making our unconscious thinking conscious.

The stories we tell everyday and the way we talk about environmental issues really does matter. It’s about being empathetic and acting compassionately.

Authentic Storytelling

Policy and documents, facts and figures, charts and data—they will always be part of the conversation. But, they are not how we get people to act. Emotional storytelling does this.

We relate to narratives about real people doing positive things. Accounts of communities that face their challenges are memorable. And, we’re deeply engaged when sharing anecdotes that celebrate our accomplishments. Stories connect us. They frame our perspectives.

Our story is about linking people, planet, and profit so that we shift our worldview to one of connection, empathy, and compassion.

Feature Project: NCC Magazine

After many years of producing a standard newsletter for its donors Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) decided it was time to reach out in new and creative ways. Launched in the spring of 2016, NCC Magazine continues the organization’s evolution in communications, following the launch of a new logo in the summer of 2015, with a publication that celebrates and inspires.

Incorporating storytelling, profiles, service content and information design into the overall approach, the lands and waters protected by NCC provided the lens for an editorial strategy that tells stories of people, wildlife and places connected to their stewardship. After developing the editorial strategy and design Evermaven continues to work with NCC on producing future issues.

About NCC
The Nature Conservancy of Canada is the nation’s leading land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the species they sustain. Since 1962, NCC and its partners have helped to protect 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares), coast to coast.

More of Our Work

International Conservation Fund of Canada


Nature Conservancy of Canada


Asian Carp


Kayapo Journey


Canadian Wildlife Magazine


Growing Local

Heartwood Blog

One adult Southern Rockhopper Penguin (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) leads a group of young chicks into the sea. Scientists speculate the adult penguins might be teaching the young chicks to swim. 

Some Southern Rockhopper Penguin nesting colonies have recently shown dramatic falls in the number of breeding pairs. The Falkland Islands once housed the stronghold for Southern Rockhopper Penguins, but over the last 60 years, numbers have declined by 90 percent.

A number of threats may be contributing to the declining populations of the Southern Rockhopper Penguin, although the importance of individual threats and how they interact to impact on penguin populations are currently poorly understood.

Saunders Island, Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas.

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